Historical heritage in Teliucu Inferior - Hațeg Country - Pădureni Land

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Historical heritage in Teliucu Inferior

Pădureni Land > Teliucu Inferior
1. Rustic villa in the village of Cinciş-Cerna in the place called '' Sileşte ''
There were discovered tools from primitive commune from the 2nd to 3rd century, exhibited in the Cinciş village museum and at the Museum of Geology in Bucharest. The Villa is a stone-made building with mortar (opus incertum), from which the foundations of the building and archaeological materials such as Roman ceramics, iron objects were preserved. The old settlement dates back to the 2nd and 3rd cent. Of the displaced locality Cincis-Cerna, where the Roman ruins of the Roman period were exploited - Villa Rustica, located 1 km away from the relocated village of Cinciş.

2. Tumble necropole (Necropola tumulara) in the village Cinciş-Cerna at the place called "Popeasca" or "Ţelina"
In 1935, stone statues of the 2nd-3rd century were discovered, representing a man in a toga and two women in natural size. These statues date back to the Dacian-Roman period. The necropolis, consisting of 17 tomb graves (four of which are inside a built funerary monument) is attributed to a community related to the exploitation of iron mines in the region. Roman tumular necropolis, located to the north of the former monument at approx. 200 m, is located in the place named "Ţelina".

From a historical and archaeological point of view, there are assumptions that put the beginnings of some component settlements, for example the village of Cinciş-Cerna, in the farthest times.

On the territory of the village, in the place called "Silişte", there were some tools from the primitive commune: hammers of carved stone of Neolithic man, which make us believe that the first human settlements on these lands date from the primitive man's age. These tools are located at the museum of Cinciş village and the geological museum in Bucharest.

On the territory of Cinciş, in the place called "Lăturoasa" and more precisely "Popeasca", in 1935 were discovered stone statues representing a man in a trot and two women in natural size. These statues date back to the Dacian-Roman period.

For the ethnic Dacian character of the local cemetery, both the traditional ritual of the incineration and the type of the tumulus, as well as the elements of the Dacian material cultivation - the hand-made ceramics - are advocated. The necropolis comprising 17 tumble tombs (four of which are inside a built funerary monument) Is attributed to a community related to the exploitation of iron mines in the region.Villa is a stone construction linked to mortar (opus incertum), from which the foundations of the building and archaeological materials such as Roman ceramics, iron objects, etc. were preserved.

 
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